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Depth of Bullying

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Depth of Bullying

Harmless student being targeted in cyberbullying

Harmless student being targeted in cyberbullying

Harmless student being targeted in cyberbullying

Harmless student being targeted in cyberbullying

Savanna Rose Bautista, Staff Writer

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Bul-ly, pronounced ˈbo͝olē, is to use superior strength or influence to intimidate someone. Synonyms include: to persecute, oppress, tyrannize, browbeat, harass, torment, intimidate, strong-arm, dominate, push around, bullyrag, coerce, pressure, pressurize, press, push, force, compel; badger, goad, prod, browbeat, intimidate, dragoon, strong-arm; bulldoze, railroad, lean on and abuse. These terms however is associated with physical interaction and is not described in depth by the definition on the Google Search engine.

According to Merriam-webster.com bullying means to, abuse and mistreat someone vulnerable by someone stronger or more powerful. On Wikipedia.org however, bullying is the use of force, threat, or coercion to abuse, intimidate, or aggressively dominate others. The behavior is often repeated and habitual.

Bullying has three key components which many are well aware of—unwanted, aggressive behavior; a real or perceived power imbalance, and repetition; and the potential to be repeated over time [See stopbullying.gov]. The combination of these three factors creates a situation that moves beyond conflict to become persistent persecution. The repetition factor is associated with abuse.  

Abuse, the acquainted verb of the noun Bully, is to use (something or someone) to badly affect or for a bad purpose; misuse, treat (a person or an animal) with cruelty or violence, especially regularly or repeatedly. Synonyms include misuse, misapply, misemploy; exploit, take advantage of, mistreat, maltreat, ill-treat, treat badly; molest, interfere with, indecently assault, sexually abuse, sexually assault; injure, hurt, harm, and damage.

Unfortunately, neither words emphasize by definition its other uses beyond physical approach or threat. Other relevant words may include, manipulation, black-mail, mind games, taunting, and harassment.

“You don’t have to hit a person to bully them. You don’t have to hit a person to abuse them.” Said Senior Leslie Estrada at Vista del Lago.

Bullying/Abuse can occur during or after school hours. While most reported bullying happens in a school building, a significant percentage also happens in places like playgrounds or school buses. It can also happen travelling to or from school, or in the youth’s neighborhood. Children aren’t the only victims either; bullying and abuse also occur within, during and after work hours and also in relationships; including both family and affairs.

Workplace bullying is a persistent pattern of mistreatment from others in the workplace that causes either physical or emotional harm. It can include such tactics as verbal, nonverbal, psychological, physical abuse and humiliation.

Abuse in the family between a guardian and the adolescent is defined as Child abuse. The roles happen to be switched (not common, but known) is Parental abuse. Between spouses is known as Domestic abuse.

Both young and older age groups commonly engage in the inappropriate activity using electronics. Abuse that takes place over digital devices like cell phones, computers, and tablets using the internet [and/or wi-fi] to utilize social media in order to harass, threaten, embarrass, ruin reputation or target another person(s). This is called Cyberbullying, also known as cyber harassment or online abuse. The form of bullying or harassment using electronic forms of contact. Cyberbullying has become increasingly common amongst the moderation of technology and has made it easier for Abusers to attack their victims. Cyberbullying includes sending, posting, or sharing negative, harmful, false, or mean content about someone else. It can also include sharing personal or private information about someone else causing embarrassment or humiliation. Some cyberbullying crosses the line into unlawful or criminal behavior.

The most common places where cyberbullying occurs are: Social Media, such as Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, Twitter, SMS (Short Message Service) also known as Text Message sent through devices, Instant Message (via devices, email provider services, apps, and social media messaging features), and Email.

With the prevalence of social media and digital forums, comments, photos, posts, and content shared by individuals can often be viewed by strangers as well as acquaintances. The content an individual shares online – both their personal content as well as any negative, mean, or hurtful content – creates a kind of permanent public record of their views, activities, and behavior.

This public record can be thought of as an online reputation, which may be accessible to schools, employers, colleges, clubs, and others who may be researching an individual now or in the future. Cyberbullying can harm the online reputations of everyone involved – not just the person being bullied.

Bullying is often easier to prove through digital screenshots and conversation history. However, if not done digitally and more through whispers and rumours it is more harsher to undergo providing with any evidence only using witnesses and observers.

While all states have criminal laws that apply to bullying, not all have special statutes that apply to cyberbullying or bullying that takes place outside of school or work environments. Schools may take action either as required by law, or with local or school policies that allow them to discipline or take other action. Job’s oftenly brush off the situation as ‘they-are-adults’ or ‘can’t control what people say about you or what they do.’ Some states also have provisions to address bullying if it affects school or career performance.

Schools may choose to implement formal evidence-based programs or curricula. Many evaluated programs that address bullying are designed for use in elementary and middle schools. Fewer programs exist for high schools and non-school settings. There are many considerations in selecting a program, including the school’s demographics, capacity, and resources. Also, be sure to avoid Misdirections in Bullying Prevention and Responses.

Evelynn Lopez a senior at the High School shares, “Most teachers do look out for students, but the school as a whole doesn’t put much effort.”

To ensure that bullying prevention efforts are successful, all staff need to be trained on what bullying is, what the school’s policies and rules are, and how to enforce the rules. Training may take many forms: staff meetings, one-day training sessions, and teaching through modeling preferred behavior. Schools may choose any combination of these training options based on available funding, staff resources, and time.

Training can be successful when staff are engaged in developing messages and content, and when they feel that their voices are being heard. Learning should be relevant to their roles and responsibilities to help build buy-in.

Bullying of all forms is persistent, permanent and hard to notice; leaving a huge impact on the individual’s thought process and social experience. Some types of bullying/abuse named are: discriminatory abuse, financial neglect, physical abuse, psychological abuse, emotional abuse, sexual abuse, and verbal abuse. Help yourself or a loved one if they are the victim of Abuse. Help yourself or a loved one if they are the Abuser.

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The student voice of Vista del Lago High School
Depth of Bullying