Let’s Talk Taboo

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Let’s Talk Taboo

Freshman Irah Raguindin (left) and Senior Elizabeth Covarrubias (right) have a laugh in theater at scandalous jokes after school.

Freshman Irah Raguindin (left) and Senior Elizabeth Covarrubias (right) have a laugh in theater at scandalous jokes after school.

Freshman Irah Raguindin (left) and Senior Elizabeth Covarrubias (right) have a laugh in theater at scandalous jokes after school.

Freshman Irah Raguindin (left) and Senior Elizabeth Covarrubias (right) have a laugh in theater at scandalous jokes after school.

Tierra Hampton, Staff Writer

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The year is 1960. Three friends are having brunch in a cafe outside. They’ve caught up on work, family, and spouses. Karen talks about her well delayed divorce with the ladies, “The only thing he has big is a wallet.”, she says casually while she sips her herbal tea. “Oh my gosh Karen! You shouldn’t speak so foul.” Samantha urges. “Well, it’s true.” Karen protested. The ladies giggle for a while, and continue to talk about how their children are doing in school.

Nowadays, students don’t have censors on what can be said in public and what can’t. Taboo subjects are prohibited or restricted by social custom and are being normalized to a state where the lines between communicating and over sharing are becoming blurred.

Teacher Charlotte Jones shared, “Students have always been able to talk about taboo subjects because they talk to their friends and people they confide in about things like that. I think speaking freely about certain things depends on the person and their comfortability to share things with other people or not.”

In today’s society, people can admit that times have changed drastically. Teens are open to more topics that people used to be ashamed of talking about. With sex being idealized on T.V., alcohol and drugs being widely distributed, and vulgarity being played on the radio, it has separated today’s generation from the past.  

Senior Alejandro Perez expressed, “I think that today’s time has a lot to do with teens being more open to talking about ‘awkward’ topics because it’s usually displayed on social media. I think social media makes it more open to society to live in their own truth about sexual preferences, profanity, and intimacy.”  

Teens have all heard their parents at one time or another say, “Back in my day…”, which entails that back in their day, times were different. In the way they behaved, the things they did, and the things they said. But what if students were in their shoes? The new culture presented today might have a stronger impact on students than they might even realize.

Senior Leslie Estrada stated, “If we were fifty-seven years in the past (1960), I don’t think teens would talk about degrading things or talk vulgarly. Today’s generation has definitely accepted this custom of doing things. It’s not weird or awkward because we’ve made it normal, which can be a good and a bad thing at times.”  

Getting intimate with one’s partner isn’t wrong. Having a party with “liquid courage” isn’t necessarily wrong, but when people blast it to the public, that invading is not only personal privacy but personal comfort Over sharing is not caring, so let’s change the way society encourages erratic behavior by freely sharing it today.

As time evolves, people evolve with it, but with time, wisdom comes with it. Society can use the wisdom of the past and present to shape the future, for people are more than the private activities they may indulge in.

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